International Book Fairs


1. The World of Ancient Persia

International book fairs offer an opportunity for cultural exchange in the form of negotiations and commercial agreements, whereas museums make room for modern man’s interaction with the historical assets of other peoples and countries. Wherever I go, visiting museums is an inseparable part of my programs, and visiting their Persian section is a high priority – the Louvre of Paris, the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, the British Museum of London, etc. A few years ago I had a visit the British Museum’s section entitled “Forgotten Empire, The World of Ancient Persia,” a vast empire whose borders reached the Black Sea to the north, Syr Darya to the east, Ethiopia to the south, and Egypt and Cyprus to the west. Within my short six-hour tour, I managed to see the royal seal of the Achaemenid dating back to the 5th century B.C. – that is about 2500 years before now – which were used for printing on clay tablets. It was at this time that Cyrus the Great codified his world-known cylinder of human rights as a priceless piece of universal heritage, a cylinder in cuneiform script, the script abundantly used and now being found on various petroglyphs across Iran. A good example of the prevalence of scripts, writing, and thought in the ancient land of Iran.

 

2. EVE’s design

As Wall-E director Andrew Stanton told CNN Money in a 2008 interview, EVE was designed to look like an Apple product.

From CNN Money:

“A call from Stanton to Jobs in 2005 resulted in Johnny Ive, Apple’s behind-the-scenes design guru, driving across the San Francisco Bay to Pixar’s converted warehouse headquarters to spend a day consulting on the Eve prototype.”

3. There’s a Mac in the Land of the Dead

In Coco, when Mamá Imelda tries to find out why she can’t leave the Land of the Dead to go visit her family, the clerk assisting her uses a Macintosh computer to look her up.

According to Pixar Wikia, the computer is likely Apple’s earliest computer model, the Macintosh 128K which launched in 1984, according to Wired. An Apple sponsored racer is named Mac iCar. This is less of a reference to Apple than it is Pixar screaming, “Hey, did you know we have a connection to Apple?” We searched through the internet and combed through the Pixar, to find some of the most obvious Apple references in Pixar’s slate of films. From the barely subtle to the absolutely in your face, these are the top five most obvious Apple references. An Apple sponsored racer is named Mac iCar. This is less of a reference to Apple than it is Pixar screaming.

 

4. Holley Shift well designs apps in Mac

Finn McMissile explains that Holley Shiftwell’s cover is “designing iPhone apps.” How a car could make use of a phone app? Who knows.

Apple’s App store debuted 10 years ago, according to the Washington Post, only three years prior to Cars 2’s release. We searched through the internet and combed through the Pixar, to find some of the most obvious Apple references in Pixar’s slate of films. From the barely subtle to the absolutely in your face, these are the top five most obvious Apple references. Washington Post, only three years prior to Cars 2’s release. We searched through the internet and combed through the Apple, to find some of the most obvious Apple references.

 

5. A racer is sponsored by Apple in Cars

An Apple sponsored racer is named Mac iCar. This is less of a reference to Apple than it is Pixar screaming, “Hey, did you know we have a connection to Apple?”

Mac iCar’s racing number is also 84. As we noted above, 1984 is the year Apple released its first personal computer, the Macintosh 128K.

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